Tag Archives: NYT

The New York Times: Movies

Alden Ehrenreich has officially been cast as the young Han Solo in a coming stand-alone “Star Wars” film from Disney. The movie, as yet untitled, will follow Solo’s life before 1977’s “Star Wars: Episode IV — A New Hope.” Mr. Ehrenreich will follow in the footsteps of Harrison Ford, who, of course, originated the role.

Mr. Ehrenreich, 26, starred in “Beautiful Creatures” (2013) and had a supporting role in Woody Allen’s “Blue Jasmine” (2013). He also appeared earlier this year in the Coen brothers’ film “Hail, Caesar!” alongside George Clooney, Channing Tatum and Scarlett Johansson.

Set to be released in May 2018, the “Star Wars” movie will be directed by Phil Lord and Chris Miller, the filmmakers behind “The Lego Movie” and “21 Jump Street.”

Continue reading the main story at The New York Times.

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New York Times/ Women In The World: International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda

Weapon of war

Filmmaker documents historic trial that made rape a war crime

Michele Mitchell talks about her new film “The Uncondemned,” about a landmark case that successfully prosecuted rape as a crime against humanity

Photo courtesy Michele Mitchell

PHOTO COURTESY MICHELE MITCHELL

“Mankind better stand back up on that issue if we are going to survive as a species,” a rape psychologist in the Democratic Republic of the Congo told filmmaker Michele Mitchell in an interview about her new documentary, The Uncondemned, which explores the successful prosecution by the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) of rape as a war crime for the first time in history.

The defendant in question was Jean-Paul Akayesu, a former teacher who served as the mayor of Taba, Rwanda during the 1994 genocide in that country. On his watch, and with his direct involvement, Tutsi men, women and children there were systematically hounded and murdered by the Interahamwe Hutu militias. Akayesu was arrested in Zambia in 1995 and extradited to stand trial before the ICTR for crimes ranging from genocide to violations of the Geneva Convention. And, on June 17, 1997, the indictment against him was amended to include the unprecedented charge of rape as a crime of genocide and as a crime against humanity. In celebration of that historic moment, filmmakers Michele Mitchell and Nick Louvel will be holding a filmmakers’ screening exactly 16 years later in Rwanda.

The tenacious team of prosecutors, activists and scholars who joined forces to win the case—Akayesuwas sentenced to life imprisonment in 1998—had help from pivotal witnesses who took the stand to recount their rapes during the genocide. After being identified with codenames during the trial, these women reveal their names in the film for the first time. The screening will be held for everyone who was a part of the ICTR: Rwandan government officials, the U.S. ambassador, and many others from the diplomatic community. Women In the World spoke with co-director Michele Mitchell about The Uncondemned, rape as a war crime, and the use of terror by Boko Haram and ISIS.

WITW: What made you want to focus on rape as a weapon of war?

Michele Mitchell: There is no ambiguity about rape as a weapon of war. It is an act of deadly intent. The victims are women and men, children and elderly. So it’s not about “sex.” It’s about power, humiliation and torture. We wanted to tell a story of what to do about it.

WITW: Can you talk about Boko Haram and ISIS using rape as a weapon of war today?

MM: Both groups have openly bragged that they are using it as a weapon of terror. And those are the two examples that we know of. We need to take rape as seriously as we do other war crimes, and we — as a society, our government — aren’t doing that.

 

Read the article at Women In The World.

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New York Times/ Women In The World: An Interview With Planned Parenthood’s Latanya Mapp Frett

Weapon of war

Boko Haram rapes are compounding an already troubling problem in Nigeria

Complicating the evils perpetuated by Boko Haram is inadequate reproductive health care in Nigeria, Latanya Mapp Frett of Planned Parenthood Global says

Three teenagers who escaped a Boko Haram mass kidnapping in the northeast Nigerian town of Chibok last year./ (EMMANUEL AREWA/AFP/Getty Images)

THREE TEENAGERS WHO ESCAPED A BOKO HARAM MASS KIDNAPPING IN THE NORTHEAST NIGERIAN TOWN OF CHIBOK LAST YEAR./ (EMMANUEL AREWA/AFP/GETTY IMAGES)

This week, the horrors of Boko Haram’s coordinated campaign of violence against women were underscored by a new report that many of the girls and women who have been abducted by the extremist group were repeatedly raped with the goal of impregnation. Latanya Mapp Frett, who first spent time in Nigeria in her roles with the United Nations Children’s Fund and the United States Agency for International Development, spoke to Women in the World about violence against women and girls and her new mission as executive director of Planned Parenthood Global. Acute crises like the kidnappings and the use of rape as a weapon of terrorism focus the world’s attention, but sexual and reproductive health in Nigeria is precarious to begin with. Frett describes the collaborative efforts to change that.

Women in the World:  The world began to focus on Nigeria with the Boko Haram kidnappings, but it seems to be the tip of the iceberg. What is the most underreported story about Boko Haram?

Latanya Mapp Frett: Many of the rescued Boko Haram hostages are reportedly pregnant as a result of rape. They deserve access to a comprehensive package of sexual and reproductive health services including safe abortion.

 

Read more at The New York Times.

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