Monthly Archives: May 2015

New York Times/ Women In The World: An Interview With Planned Parenthood’s Latanya Mapp Frett

Weapon of war

Boko Haram rapes are compounding an already troubling problem in Nigeria

Complicating the evils perpetuated by Boko Haram is inadequate reproductive health care in Nigeria, Latanya Mapp Frett of Planned Parenthood Global says

Three teenagers who escaped a Boko Haram mass kidnapping in the northeast Nigerian town of Chibok last year./ (EMMANUEL AREWA/AFP/Getty Images)

THREE TEENAGERS WHO ESCAPED A BOKO HARAM MASS KIDNAPPING IN THE NORTHEAST NIGERIAN TOWN OF CHIBOK LAST YEAR./ (EMMANUEL AREWA/AFP/GETTY IMAGES)

This week, the horrors of Boko Haram’s coordinated campaign of violence against women were underscored by a new report that many of the girls and women who have been abducted by the extremist group were repeatedly raped with the goal of impregnation. Latanya Mapp Frett, who first spent time in Nigeria in her roles with the United Nations Children’s Fund and the United States Agency for International Development, spoke to Women in the World about violence against women and girls and her new mission as executive director of Planned Parenthood Global. Acute crises like the kidnappings and the use of rape as a weapon of terrorism focus the world’s attention, but sexual and reproductive health in Nigeria is precarious to begin with. Frett describes the collaborative efforts to change that.

Women in the World:  The world began to focus on Nigeria with the Boko Haram kidnappings, but it seems to be the tip of the iceberg. What is the most underreported story about Boko Haram?

Latanya Mapp Frett: Many of the rescued Boko Haram hostages are reportedly pregnant as a result of rape. They deserve access to a comprehensive package of sexual and reproductive health services including safe abortion.

 

Read more at The New York Times.

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Filed under Interviews, New York Times, Non Profit, Planned Parenthood, Sexual Assault Awareness, Women In The World

New York Times/ Women In The World: An Interview With Katie Ford

Freedom for all

“Eight years ago, I did not know that slavery existed today”

The former CEO of Ford Models wants to end modern day slavery

JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/Getty Images

JOHAN ORDONEZ/AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Despite abundant evidence that it still persists in modern times, many people relegate slavery to the past. But human trafficking could be found in your neighbor’s house, anywhere from downtown Manhattan to Brazil. The human trafficking trade is the second most profitable criminal enterprise after drug trafficking, affecting more than 2.45 million people daily with a total market value of $31.6 billion, according to the United Nations.

Globally, the majority of trafficking victims are women and girls — about 75 percent according to the same study. The victims’ fates range from forced labour to sex slavery. They are often brought to unfamiliar environments where they don’t know anyone or even the language, further isolating them.

Many stories make the news; ISIS has abducted thousands of women and girls, Boko Haram infamously kidnapped 276 Chibok schoolgirls, threatening to traffic them and hundreds of other girls and women they have abducted. But many stories do not make the news.

Katie Ford, a giant in the modeling world, has been working to end modern day slavery. The former CEO of Ford Models will host an annual benefit for her foundation Freedom For All on May 13 where three survivors of human trafficking from the Philippines will share their stories.

 

Read more at The New York Times.

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Filed under Ford Models, New York City, New York Times, Non Profit, NYC, NYT, United Nations, Women In The World, Writing